Nature

On our branch of the ape evolutionary tree, humans weren’t always alone. The Neanderthals are the most well-known of our distant cousins. (Photo : Max Fleischer, Dave Fleischer and Ovide Decroly on Wikimedia Commons) Outdated Views on Neanderthals We used to call Neanderthals a less complex and clever version of ourselves, which was an insult
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NEWS 18 November 2021 Do childhood colds help the body respond to COVID? A mechanism known as ‘original antigenic sin’ protects some people from flu; whether it helps immune reactions to coronaviruses is still unclear. Rachel Brazil Rachel Brazil View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Twitter Facebook
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CAREER COLUMN 18 November 2021 Adopting as academics: what we learnt Our quest to bring a child into our family led us to confront academic working practices, say Tony Ly and Nathan W. Bailey. Tony Ly 0 & Nathan W. Bailey 1 Tony Ly Tony Ly is a biomedical researcher and Sir Henry Dale fellow
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Tree groups’ ranges are moving as climatic conditions change. This process is being accelerated by wildfire, which lowers competition from established species, raising issues about managing land in a period of evolving ecosystems. (Photo : Getty Images) Tree Ranges (Photo : Getty Images) In forests across the western United States, trees are on the move.
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A research group used AI systems and night vision sensors to examine the movement of a spider’s eight limbs while building a web. Spiders, despite being tiny, can waltz on a human’s toenail, and are susceptible of stunningly exquisite and intricate architectural marvels. The final outcome is a simulation that can anticipate the phases of web formation
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CORRESPONDENCE 16 November 2021 Presidents of Royal Society live long lives Oscar S. Wilson 0 & Herbert E. Huppert 1 Oscar S. Wilson King’s College, Cambridge, UK. View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Herbert E. Huppert King’s College, Cambridge, UK. View author publications You can also search
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CORRESPONDENCE 16 November 2021 Funders need to credit open science Hans de Jonge 0 , Maria Cruz 1 & Stephanie Holst 2 Hans de Jonge Dutch Research Council, The Hague, the Netherlands. View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Maria Cruz Dutch Research Council, The Hague, the Netherlands.
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CAREER FEATURE 15 November 2021 How to turn your ideas into patents Researchers and intellectual-property specialists offer their tips for deciding which discoveries are worth patenting, and how to do the homework needed for success. Andy Tay 0 Andy Tay Andy Tay is a science writer in Singapore. View author publications You can also search
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NEWS EXPLAINER 15 November 2021 More Alzheimer’s drugs head for FDA review: what scientists are watching Eli Lilly and other pharma firms have begun submitting their anti-amyloid drug hopefuls for approval. But questions linger over the controversial precedent set by Biogen’s aducanumab. Asher Mullard Asher Mullard View author publications You can also search for this
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Download PDF My work focuses on creating clean colour. Many conventional fabric dyes are made using unsustainable processes. Indigo dye, for example, is usually made from petroleum-derived aniline in a high-temperature process that involves formaldehyde and cyanide. Globally, around 20% of industrial water pollution comes from fabric dyeing. I want to make dyes using microbial
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In the past 2000 years, volcanic eruptions contributed to collapse of China’s most powerful dynasties and a study found that this resulted to temporary global cooling and affected agriculture. Large volcanic eruptions release sunlight-reflecting sulphate aerosols into the air, blocking sunlight for a year or two. The scarcity of warm atmosphere cools and dries climates,
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Download PDF Emerging from the overhanging canopy, our ravening eyes consumed a castle wreathed in low mist. Ruined, it rose against a silver sky where ravens screeched, jade retro data glancing off gliding wings. “That’s Castle Argiope,” says Reverend Gates. He’s a handsome fellow: tall, stern. But everyone’s avatar is attractive, and the reverend has
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Palm cockatoo – the largest parrot in Australia – is well-known as the only non-human animal to make sound-related tools. This bird produces drumsticks to generate a rhythmic beat. Sadly, extinction is threatening the “Ringo Starr” of the avian world just like many other parrots.  The Queensland government listed palm cockatoo, also known as the
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Nature Video 12 November 2021 Your COP26 questions answered: Is it too late? Scientists are divided as COP26 reaches its crucial final day Dan Fox & Nick Petrić Howe Dan Fox View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Nick Petrić Howe View author publications You can also search
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Nature Video 12 November 2021 The final hours: Nature reporters reflect on COP26 Nature’s team on the ground at COP26, reflect on their experience of the pivotal climate conference Flora Graham , Ehsan Masood , Quirin Schiermeier , Dan Fox & Nick Petrić Howe Flora Graham View author publications You can also search for this
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Researchers have harnessed the world’s brightest X-rays to create intricate maps of human organs at various scales, from the entire organ down to individual cells 1. Access options Access through your institution Change institution Buy or subscribe Subscribe to Journal Get full journal access for 1 year 199,00 € only 3,90 € per issue Subscribe
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NATURE PODCAST 12 November 2021 Coronapod: new hope from COVID antiviral drugs Two antiviral drugs could change the course of the pandemic, but scientists still have questions Noah Baker Noah Baker View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share
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Cold-loving creatures known as Pacific Ocean rockfishes have wildly varying lifespans. The species Sebastes minor lasts a mere 11 years; its cousin Sebastes aleutianus can live for more than 2 centuries. Scientists have now pinpointed genes linked to this remarkable range1. Access options Access through your institution Change institution Buy or subscribe Subscribe to Journal
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Correction to: Nature https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-020-2313-xPublished online 7 May 2020 In this Article, data in Extended Data Table 3 and Extended Data Fig. 4 were mislabelled and attributed incorrectly. The Pangolin-CoV genome reported was built using the metagenomic dataset described previously by Liu et al. in Viruses1 (ref. 15 in our Nature paper)and targeted PCR. The Viruses
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As record dry conditions compound a statewide catastrophe, over half of all California citizens are affected by a regional drought emergency. (Photo : Getty Images) California Drought (Photo : Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images) The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, which supplies water to 26 local agencies serving 19 million people, declared a state
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CAREER Q&A 11 November 2021 When Finnish researchers took on the Twitter trolls A nation’s scientists took to social media in response to criticism of their research, with surprising results. Sami Syrjämäki describes what happened. Jacqui Thornton 0 Jacqui Thornton Jacqui Thornton is a freelance writer in Winchester, UK. View author publications You can also
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NATURE PODCAST 10 November 2021 Climate Special: the past and future of the Earth’s climate Reassessing 24,000 years of global temperatures, and on the ground at COP26. Benjamin Thompson & Shamini Bundell Benjamin Thompson View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Shamini Bundell View author publications You can
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When a cooler, drier climate allowed grasslands to spread and habitually bipedal human ancestors first appeared on the scene millions of years ago, a remarkably well-preserved fossil elephant cranium from Kenya is helping scientists figure out how its species became the dominant elephant in eastern Africa. (Photo : Wikimedia Commons) It is the only well-preserved
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RESEARCH HIGHLIGHT 10 November 2021 Bendable mini-scanner records every loop of a fingerprint A device that can fit in a person’s palm has enough resolution to capture fingerprints for biometric identification. Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Share via E-Mail Share via E-Mail An image (left) taken with a
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CORRESPONDENCE 09 November 2021 Remembering a great friend of Nature Peter Newmark 0 Peter Newmark London. View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Share via E-Mail Share via E-Mail Walter Gratzer, a biophysicist with a distinguished
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CORRESPONDENCE 09 November 2021 Japan: prize diversity, not conformity, to boost research Guojun Sheng  ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-6759-3785 0 , Piero Carninci  ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-7202-7243 1 , Mikiko C. Siomi  ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-6149-4396 2 , Toshio Suda  ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-7540-1771 3 & Cantas Alev  ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-4879-8782 4 Guojun Sheng Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan. View author publications You can also search
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