Nature

NATURE PODCAST 20 October 2021 Omnimagnets move non-magnetic objects every which way An ancient solar storm helps pinpoint when Vikings lived in the Americas, and using magnets to deftly move non-magnetic metals. Benjamin Thompson & Nick Petrić Howe Benjamin Thompson View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Nick
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According to a study by researchers at Rutgers University, the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and other institutions, a potential nuclear war may have devastating effects on humanity for years to come. Smoke from the resulting fires would cause climate change that could last up to 15 years. This in turn would threaten global food
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NEWS FEATURE 20 October 2021 Why fossil fuel subsidies are so hard to kill Behind the struggle to stop governments propping up the coal, oil and gas industries. Jocelyn Timperley 0 Jocelyn Timperley Jocelyn Timperley is a freelance climate journalist in San José, Costa Rica. View author publications You can also search for this author
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CORRESPONDENCE 19 October 2021 Countries of the Indo-Gangetic Plain must unite against air pollution Muhammad Fahim Khokhar  ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-4489-6593 0 , Muhammad Shehzaib Anjum  ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-2873-5741 1 , Abdus Salam  ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5609-6828 2 , Vinayak Sinha  ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5508-0779 3 , Manish Naja  ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-4597-1690 4 , Hiroshi Tanimoto  ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5424-9923 5 , James H. Crawford
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Scorpions are venomous reptiles. They’ve one of the most ferocious beasts here on earth for millennia, with their 8 legs, a brace of anguish forceps, and a tail that culminates in a stinger. History, astronomy, Greek myths, games consoles, and corporate logos all contain them Nevertheless, in a recent finding, there was another identical seen
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NEWS AND VIEWS 19 October 2021 From the archive Nature’s pages feature a look at the wonders of chemistry from a human angle and describe a solar explosion. Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Share via E-Mail Share via E-Mail 100 Years Ago Access options Access through your institution
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CORRESPONDENCE 19 October 2021 United States has several programmes for early-career leaders Dalal Najib 0 , John Boright 1 & John Hildebrand 2 Dalal Najib National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Washington DC, USA. View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar John Boright National Academies of Sciences,
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NEWS 19 October 2021 Attempt to charge Mexican scientists with ‘organized crime’ prompts international outcry The Mexican government has accused 31 scientists and officials of organized crime and money laundering — allegations that they deny and that many claim are politically motivated. Sara Reardon 0 Sara Reardon Sara Reardon is a freelance writer in Bozeman,
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Lakes throughout the world are getting warmer and freezing for fewer days per year because of global climate change1. Access options Access through your institution Change institution Buy or subscribe Subscribe to Journal Get full journal access for 1 year 199,00 € only 3,90 € per issue Subscribe Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout.
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Companies that contributed millions of pounds to sponsor the Cop26 climate conference have blasted it as “mismanaged” and “very last minute” as the event in Glasgow approaches next month. The sponsors, which include some of the country’s largest corporations, have filed formal complaints with the government, blaming “very inexperienced” civil servants for delayed decisions, poor
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NATURE BRIEFING 15 October 2021 Daily briefing: The puzzle of COVID super-immunity Why do people who have recovered from COVID-19 show such spectacular immune responses when they get vaccinated? Plus, the first mission to the Trojan asteroids is ready to launch and how eclectic acupuncture zaps inflammation in mice. Flora Graham Flora Graham View author
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Although the Atlantic hurricane season doesn’t technically finish until November 30, experts say the chances of another tropical storm forming shortly are slim. There is currently just one name remaining on the list of storm names for 2021, after a hectic pace during hurricane season’s peak. Wanda. Is it possible that that name will go unnoticed?
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CAREER COLUMN 15 October 2021 How I wrote a pop-science book Much of John Tregoning’s pandemic year was spent writing a book about infectious disease. Now that it’s out, what has he learnt? John Tregoning 0 John Tregoning John Tregoning is a reader in respiratory infections in the Department of Infectious Disease, Imperial College London,
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Download PDF When it comes to preserving the cherished memories of the vacation where he’ll propose to his girlfriend, Ryan Burkeman doesn’t play cheap. Somewhere in the lines of the itemized receipt from his travel agent — signed off on by the happy couple — is the cost of an extra airline ticket: first class,
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Industrial fishing might have disrupted some of the chemical flows in the ocean as much as human-induced climate change has1. Access options Access through your institution Change institution Buy or subscribe Subscribe to Journal Get full journal access for 1 year 199,00 € only 3,90 € per issue Subscribe Tax calculation will be finalised during
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After detecting probable gasoline traces in the city’s tap water, officials in Canada’s northernmost capital have declared a municipal state of emergency. Residents of Iqaluit, the Arctic territory of Nunavut’s capital, have been advised not to consume, boil, or cook with the city’s water. Public Health Warning pic.twitter.com/3hdvDvzWfl — Government of Nunavut (@GOVofNUNAVUT) October 12,
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After the devastating mass extinction that wiped out the dinosaurs, snakes quickly developed a taste for a bountiful array of creatures — helping to give rise to the nearly 4,000 modern-day snake species1. Access options Access through your institution Change institution Buy or subscribe Subscribe to Journal Get full journal access for 1 year 199,00
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On Wednesday after three-and-a-half weeks of volcanic activity, experts said there is no chance that the volcanic eruption in Spain’s Canary Islands will come to an end any time soon. (Photo : Getty Images) La Palma Volcano  A spokesman for the Canaries’ volcanologist group Pevolca, Maria Jose Blanco said at the Cumbre Vieja volcano which
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As a violet-blue light washes over a newly created gel, the glow prompts ‘traveller’ molecules embedded within to begin their march — a journey that could lead to the development of new molecular-scale machines1. Access options Access through your institution Change institution Buy or subscribe Subscribe to Journal Get full journal access for 1 year
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Some mentoring relationships last for decades. How do they change over time? Julie Gould finds out. Your browser does not support the audio element. Download MP3 See transcript Some researchers never lose touch with group leaders or committee members who mentored them as graduate students. As Jen Heemstra, a chemistry professor at Emory University in
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1. Tsui, D. C., Stormer, H. L. & Gossard, A. C. Two-dimensional magnetotransport in the extreme quantum limit. Phys. Rev. Lett. 48, 1559–1562 (1982). ADS  CAS  Article  Google Scholar  2. Laughlin, R. B. Anomalous quantum hall effect: an incompressible quantum fluid with fractionally charged excitations. Phys. Rev. Lett. 50, 1395–1398 (1983). ADS  Article  Google Scholar 
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NATURE PODCAST 13 October 2021 How electric acupuncture zaps inflammation in mice The neurons behind acupuncture’s effect on inflammation, and how antibiotics affect gut bacteria. Benjamin Thompson & Shamini Bundell Benjamin Thompson View author publications You can also search for this author in PubMed  Google Scholar Shamini Bundell View author publications You can also search
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NEWS ROUND-UP 13 October 2021 Vaccines and Delta, Moon volcanism and an NIH departure The latest science news, in brief. Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Share via E-Mail Share via E-Mail Download PDF A health worker gives a COVID-19 vaccine in Hanoi.Credit: Nhac Nguyen/AFP/Getty Vaccines cut delta transmission
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A massive solar storm is expected to hit Earth today, potentially wreaking havoc on electrical infrastructures and satellites throughout the globe. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has issued the geomagnetic storm notice, with a solar flare expected to impact Earth today. A massive solar flare is due to hit Earth today, authorities are warning
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Physicists have built a new kind of device for coaxing light to act like a superfluid — a fluid at very low temperatures that can flow without any internal friction1. Access options Access through your institution Change institution Buy or subscribe Subscribe to Journal Get full journal access for 1 year 199,00 € only 3,90
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A powerful magnitude 5.9 earthquake hit Tokyo on Thursday night, damaging underground water pipes and halting trains and subways. Reports say 30 more people are injured. This caused traffic disruptions and major local train delays on Friday, having hundreds of commuters overflow in Kawaguchi station and long waiting line outside of Shinjuku station. Most trains
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Tesla, founded in Silicon Valley in the early 2000s, is relocating its headquarters to Texas, where billionaire CEO Elon Musk already resides, while the company will continue to manufacture automobiles in the San Francisco Bay Area. (Photo : Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images) Musk made the revelation at Tesla’s almost finished Texas Gigafactory in Austin
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